Home Track 15: University-Community Engagement
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TRACK 16:University-Community Engagement
Track Chairs
Retha de la Harpe, IT Programme Coordinator, IT Department, Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), South Africa, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Mikko Korpela, Research Director, University of Eastern Finland, Finland, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Synopsis
This track responds to the theme of “Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries”. The proposed track will evaluate existing networks and initiatives, with a specific focus on innovation, in designing ICT solutions that are useful and appropriate to communities. The ambition here is to address the knowledge and skills gaps between universities and communities by establishing collaborative networks that actively involve members of both institutions. The strength of this endeavour is its reciprocal nature where local stakeholders are fruitfully and continuously engaged as network contributors and facilitators. The track will explore the development of possible actions involving researchers, educators, and local role players that assist citizens of local and global communities, aligned around mutual objectives in a single network.  This process seeks to create and implement innovative solutions to improve community wellbeing, interrogating the use of ICT at a technical and social level.  It is hoped that this track, as an academic objective, may explore the establishment of stable associations around mutual interests to which participants enrol willingly in the quest for meaningful community engagement.

Call for Papers
Researchers, academics and practitioners are invited to submit papers that explore community engagement by universities. Practical university-community engagement is not generally formalized in transparent and readily available policies or collaboration models – this is in line with the findings of Hall (2010). Favish (2010) proposes a common discourse policy framework for social responsiveness. Bender (2009) indicates that research on curricular community engagement is lacking, if not imperative, stating that community engagement can be regarded as a method, process, programme and practice in higher education.
Authors are invited to submit papers along the following key track themes:
1. University-community engagement theories, collaboration models, and methods
2. ICT4D and ISD4D (information systems development for development) by universities for communities
3. Participatory design and development
4. Service design, user experience and usability
5. Networks aligned around community engagement
6. Spaces versus places
7. Socio-technical approaches and methods
8. eHealth, mHealth and Telehealth for communities
9. Informal learning
10. Self-empowerment through sustainable engagement
11. Access to information and educational content
12. Visual communication and semi-literacy / illiteracy
13. Social networking phenomena in communities
14. North-South networks for university-community engagement
15. Developing socially responsible students in a globalised environment

For paper format and submission guidelines please refer to the main conference website. Please contact Mr Izak van Zyl ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ) for further enquiries regarding this track.

Track Panel
1. Prof Lorenzo Cantoni, Dean of Communication Sciences, University of Italian Switzerland, Lugano, Switzerland, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2. Prof Jörn Messeter, Malmo University, Sweden, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
3. Prof Emilio Mosse, University Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
4. Prof Abimbola Soriyan, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
5. Prof Dalenca Pottas, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
6. Prof Marlien Herselman, Meraka Institute, CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
7. Mr Izak van Zyl, Project Coordinator, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


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